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Mountfield

Sevenoaks Weald
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VillageNet
Kent & Sussex Village name Derivation
For the villages and towns that VillageNet covers in Kent and East Sussex
these pages shows the origination or derivation of the place names.

Alciston -to- Blackham
Alciston Originally an Anglo Saxon farming village called Aelfsige tun (The enclosed land of Aelfsige) the Domesday book mentions Alistone as being quite a valuable estate owned by the Abbey at Battle . Later it was known as Alsistone finally Alciston.

Aldington This village is a Saxon village one of the first to be settled by the Saxons around 470AD.

Aldington originally known as Ealdaingtun is derived from Eald(old) ingtun(fortified village on a hill) so would translate to 'The Old village on the hill' possibly because it was a Roman settlement .

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Alfriston Alfriston originally known as Aelfric tun the 'farmstead of Alfric' in Anglo Saxon times, was recorded in the Domesday Book as Alvriceston and had a range of other names including Alvericheston and Aveston.
There is a possibility that the name derives from Aella fyrst tun ( Aella the Saxon's first settlement), but this is conjecture. (see our page on Aelle the Saxon )

Appledore Appledore is literally an apple-tree, from the single Anglo Saxon word apuldre, and the town is thus a ‘place at the apple-tree’. It was first recorded back in the tenth century as Apuldre.

Arlington Arlington is one of those Saxon fortified hill villages probably settled by Aelle after 477AD .

The name is derived from Ar(copper) el(people) ington(fortified village on a hill) so becomes 'The people of the copper fortified village on the hill' presumably where copper and bronze were processed.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Ashburnham The name Ashburnham, probably derives from the Anglo Saxon aesc burna ham , aesc is an ash , burna is a stream and ham is a settlement so becoming 'The settlement on the Ash stream'. It later became Esseburneham in 1211 then Ashburnhame in 1320 and finally Ashburnham.

Ashurst Ashurst is derives from the Anglo Saxon aesc ash tree and hyrst or thick wood, and thus describes a thick wooded area consisting mostly of ash-trees. The first record of Ashurst is from around 1100, in the form of Aeischerste.

Barcombe Originally known as Bere comp from the Anglo Saxon bere (barley or beer) and Comp (a camp) so a 'barley growing or beer making camp'. Barley has been grown here for many years as the ouse valley is rich and fertile. Later the village was known as Bercham , then Berecombe.

Battle Battle prior to the Norman invasion was an unoccupied area in the manor of Whatlington . The name derives from the french le Batailage (the battleground), in 1251 the name was recorded as Bataille

Beckley Beckley is derived from the Anglo Saxon Beccanleah (the woodland cleared by Becca). In 880AD it was recorded as Beccanlea, and was bequethed by Alfred the Great in his will as Beccanleagh.

Beddingham Beddingham is one of those Saxon fortified valley villages settled by Aelle around 477AD .

The name is probably derived from Bedding(straw) and ham(fortified village in a valley) so becomes either 'The fortified straw village in the valley' as the area is rich farmland.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Bells Yew Green Bells Yew Green is a derivation of Bels Lieux french for beautiful place the name given to Bayham Abbey, Bells Yew Green was part of the Abbey lands. It has been know as Belsyoe, Bellisewe and Belsewes, but Bells Yew Green is not itself mentioned in the records until the 1850's when the Hastings to London train line was built.

Benenden Benenden is derived from an Anglo Saxon called Bionna and denbera (meaning a large clearing in the forest, or a swine pasture.). It is first recorded back in the Domesday Monachorum of 1070 as Bingdene.

Berwick Berwick was originally an Anglo Saxon berewic (barley farm). In the Domesday book it was recorded as Berewice.

Bidborough Bidborough is derived from the Anglo Saxon Bitta Beorg (Bitta's Hill) and not the normal derivation of Bitta burg (Bitta's fortress). It is recorded as Bitteberga in the twefth-century.

Biddenden Biddenden's name is based on the Anglo Saxon Bida denbera meaning (Bida's clearing in the forest, or a swine pasture). The name has been spelt differently in the past and it is known that before the Norman invasion of 1066 that the area was called Bydyngdene and then changed to Bidindaenne then Bidenden in the 10th century.

Bilsington Bil(blade) Bilith(look) Bile(beak) Byht(boundary) This village is a Saxon village one of the first to be settled by the Saxons around 470AD.

Aldington originally known as Ealdaingtun is derived from Eald(old) ingtun(fortified village on a hill) so would translate to 'The Old village on the hill' possibly because it was a possible Roman settlement .

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

The village is named after an Anglo Saxon tun or farmstead belonging to someone called Bilswith, and it was first recorded as Bilsvitone in the Domesday Book 1086 .


Bishopstone The name is derived from the fact that the Bishops of Chichester occupied the land from the early 8th century until the 1600's. The name is another Anglo Saxon derived name Biscopes tun (the Bishops farm). In 1199 Bishopstone was recorded as building one of the first windmills in Sussex.

Blackboys There are a few explanations to the derivation of the name. One that it came from the colour of the Charcoal burners when they emerged from the woods, but the more likely explanation is that the name means Black Wood, from the soot deposited in the woods by the charcoal. The village seems to have the same type of background as that of Kilndown in Kent. There is also a possibility that the name is devived from Richard Blakeboy who lived here in the 1300's.

Blackham Blackham seems to have its name derived from the Anglo Saxon Blaec hamm which means Black watermeadow - from the soil possibly peaty found here. In the 11th century it was called Blacheham and in the 12th century Blakeham.


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