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East Dean

Broomhill
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VillageNet
Kent & Sussex Village name Derivation
For the villages and towns that VillageNet covers in Kent and East Sussex
these pages shows the origination or derivation of the place names.

Firle -to- Hailsham
Firle Firle is believed to be derived from the Anglo Saxon fierol (meaning oak covered).

Five Ashes Believed to have been derived from the 5 ash trees on the village green in the late 1500's.

Fletching This village is a Saxon village one of the first to be settled by Aelle around 477AD.

Fletching is derived from Flesc(flesh) ing(fort or stronghold) so it translates to the Flesh Fort. As it is far up the ouse valley in the forest of Andredweald it was probably where the hunting and slaughtering of deer and boar took place. Its easy routes via the river to Malling and further south would make it a good location for this industry .

In the Domesday book of 1086 it is recorded as Flescinges, becoming Fleshing in the middle 1200's , finally Fletching after the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 .

The place names ending in ing,inge or ings were usually found on higher ground, or in places which control strategic points, and appear to surround areas first settled by the Saxons.

Flimwell Flimwell seems to have been derived from the latin fliemena wielle (the fugitives well) due to its proximity to the Kent border.

Folkington Folkington is one of those Saxon fortified hill villages probably settled by Aelle after 477AD .

The name is possibly derived from Feoh(cattle) or Folc(common people) ington(fortified village on a hill) so becomes 'The Cattle rearing fortified village on the hill' or possibly 'The Common peoples fortified village on the hill' originally these ingtons were located at the top of the hills as defensive positions but moved lower down into the more productive lowlands once the area was under Saxon control.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Fordcombe Fordcombe is possibly derived from the Anglo Saxon Ford combe (the ford at the head of the valley)

Forest Row A name derived from Medieval times for a Row of Cottages in the Ashdown Forest . First recorded in the fifteenth century as Forstrowe , then Forrest Rowe by Grynsted in the sixteenth century and Forrest Row Geeene in the seventeenth century.

Four Elms Believed to have been derived from the 4 elm trees on the village green in the late 1500's.

Framfield Framfield is possibly derived from the Anglo Saxon Freme feld (profitable clearing in the forest) or from an Saxon settler called Frema's field. The Domesday book or 1086 gives the name of Framelle, later it was known as Fremfeld, Fremefeld and now Framfield

Frant Its name is a derivation of the Anglo Saxon Fernethe, a fern covered heath or open area within the old forest of Andredsweald . During the centuries the village has been known as Fernthe, Ferthe, Fernet Farnt and finally Frant .

Friston Friston is possibly derived from the Anglo Saxon Fyrst tun (the Princes settlement), this is a possibility as it is near West Dean which was where Alfred the Great's Palace was located. Over time it has varied Fryston, Freston, Freeston, Frison and finally Friston.

Frittenden Frittenden is derived from the Anglo Saxon Fridda ing dene (The woodland pasture of Fridda's family).

Glynde Glynde is derived from the Medieval Glind meaning an enclosure, the name hasn't changed since the thirteenth century when it was recorded as Glynde.

Goudhurst Goudhurst is probably derived from the Anglo Saxon Gutha hyrst(Gutha’s wooded hill) first record in the eleventh century as Guithyrste.

Greatstone Greatstone is a recent name derived from a rock on the shore which has long since eroded away it was originally known as the Great Stone (first recorded in 1801).

Groombridge Groombridge takes its name from Anglo Saxon Grome brig (possibly furious river bridge or young mens bridge) it is first recorded in 1239 as Gromenebregge.

Guestling This village is a Saxon village one of the first to be settled by Haesta around 475AD.

Guestling is derived from Gist(yeast) el(people) ing(fort or stronghold) so it translates to the Yeast peoples Fort or Bread peoples Fort. Initially it would have been Gisting(Bread Fort) presumably it was based where wheat was grown.

The place names ending in ing,inge or ings were usually found on higher ground, or in places which control strategic points, and appear to surround areas first settled by the Saxons.

Hadlow Hadlow is probably derived from the Anglo Saxon hæth hlaw (Heather mound) and is first recorded in the Domesday book of 1086 as Haslow.

Hadlow Down Hadlow Down is probably derived from the Anglo Saxon hæth leah (Heather clearing or possibly Headda's clearing) with down added afterwards to denote a hill. In the twelfth century it was known as Hadelegh, later on in the same century down was added so it became Hadledowne.

Hailsham The name Hailsham is thought to come from the Saxon 'Haegels Ham' meaning the clearing of Haegel or possibly even Aella's Ham the clearing of Aella the Saxon. Its name has changed through the ages to Hamelsham in the Domesday book, Aylesham in the 13th century, to its present spelling in the late 1600's.


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