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VillageNet
Kent & Sussex Village name Derivation
For the villages and towns that VillageNet covers in Kent and East Sussex
these pages shows the origination or derivation of the place names.

Leigh -to- New Romney
Leigh Leigh is derived from the Anglo Saxon leah(a clearing in the forest), and first appears on record around 1100 as Lega.

Linton Linton is possibly derived from the Anglo Saxon Lilian tun(the lily growing settlement). It is also possible that it is derived from Lin tun(flax growing settlement) but this is less likely. Its first recorded as Lilintuna in around 1100.

Litlington Litlington is one of those Saxon fortified hill villages probably settled by Aelle after 477AD .

The name is derived from Wlitu(white) el(people) ington(fortified village on a hill) so becomes 'The White fortified village on the hill' originally these ingtons were located at the top of the hills as defensive positions but moved lower down into the more productive lowlands once the area was under Saxon control. The white village probably refers to the chalk land surrounding the village.

This Saxon village was probably a supplier of food to the port of Exceat and West Dean about 3 miles further south.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Little Horsted Little Horstead is derived from the Norman Hor sted(Horse Stud).

Littlestone Littlestone-on-Sea was created in the 1880's as a coastal holiday resort after the railway was brought to the Romney Marshes . Its name comes from a headland called Little Stone, which has since been eroded away.

Lullington Luh(Estuary) el(people) ington() Lullington is one of those Saxon fortified hill villages probably settled by Aelle after 477AD .

The name is derived from Luh(estuary) el(people) ington(fortified village on a hill) so becomes 'The Estuary peoples fortified village on the hill' originally these ingtons were located at the top of the hills as defensive positions but moved lower down into the more productive lowlands once the area was under Saxon control.

This Saxon village was probably a supplier of food to the port of Exceat and West Dean about 3 miles further south.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Lydd Lydd is derived from the Anglo Saxon with two possible derivations Hlid eg(Gate Island - possibly meaning the entrance to the Rother / Limen) or Hlida(a ford - possibly the shallow estuary at the mouth of the Rother / Limen ).

Lydd on Sea Lydd-on-sea is a 20th century village build just after the 2nd World War and was intended as a holiday resort, but used Lydd as the name as it was nearby.

Lympne Lympne first appears as Lemanis in Roman times. The word is originally Celtic and means elm-wood place. It has been known by many similar names through the ages, Limme, Lymme, Lymen, Limne, Limine and Lymene. The name is derived from the river Limden (Nowadays the Rother ).

Marden Marden is derived from the Anglo Saxon Maere dene(A forest clearing for horses) or Maera dene(the boundary forest clearing). It first appears on record as Maeredaen around 1100.

Maresfield Maresfield is a small village lying just north of Uckfield the name is derived from the Anglo Saxon Meres feld meaning a field with a marsh or pool in it.

Mark Cross Mark Cross is derived from the Anglo Saxon Maerc cruce(the border on the cross road).

Markbeech Derivation not yet found

Matfield Matfield is derived from the Anglo Saxon Matta feld(Matta's field). Its is first recorded in the thirteenth century as Mattefeld.

Mayfield Mayfield is derived from the Anglo Saxon Maegoa feld(Heather field). In the Domesday book of 1186 it was recorded as Megevelle.

Mereworth Mereworth is first recorded in 843 as Meranworth .

Mersham Mersham is derived from the Anglo Saxon Maersa ham(The settlement of Maersa). It is first recorded as Mersaham in 858.

Mountfield Mountfield is possibly derived from the Anglo Saxon Mund feld(powerful man's field), or Munda's field. It has had a range of names which have varied from Moundifeld, Mundifeld, Mundfield and Montifelle to the present Mountfield.

Netherfield Netherfield is derived from the Anglo Saxon Naeddre Feld(The field of adders). The Domesday book of 1086 records it as Nedrefelle , then through Nadrefeld and Nedderfelde to the modern Netherfield. The residents of Netherfield still report sightings of adders to this day in the many woods around the village.

New Romney New Romney was derived from the village of Romney (now Old Romney) which was moved further into the English Channel as the Limen / Rother deposited silt at its mouth. The name comes from the Anglo Saxon Niwe Romm eg (New ram's island) so sheep were raised on the marshes from at least Anglo Saxon times.


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